The Rodgers Era In Green Bay Is Coming To An End… And He Should Demand A Trade

“I think he’ll play somewhere else.” That’s what Hall Of Fame quarterback and Green Bay Packers legend Brett Favre said on the Rich Eisen Show the other day about Aaron Rodgers’s future in Green Bay. He’s not the only one with this opinion as many members in the media and football fans everywhere think he should leave the franchise that brought him in the NFL.

The Packers have faced criticism not only for taking Utah State quarterback Jordan Love in the first round when Rodgers has four years left on his contract but also for not doing more to upgrade the offense around him. In a draft in which a record 36 receivers were taken, the Packers took none, despite reaching the NFC Championship game under first-year coach Matt LaFleur.

Bob McGinn, a writer for the Athletic and has been a Green Bay Packers beat writer for four decades, wrote that something perhaps is brewing behind the scenes with head coach Matt LaFleur and general manager Brian Gutekunst on the future of the Green Bay Packers and Aaron Rodgers.

“Public niceties aside, my sense is LaFleur, fresh from a terrific 13-3 baptismal season, simply had enough of [Aaron] Rodgers’ act and wanted to change the narrative,” McGinn wrote. “With a first-round talent on the roster, the Packers would gain leverage with their imperial quarterback and his passive-aggressive style.” He continues with “If the Packers indeed want to be a running team next year, they surely don’t want Rodgers rocking the boat and becoming even more difficult to coach.”

Now that’s all an opinion but I don’t by any means think that a 40-plus year beat writer for a franchise would come up with that out of the blue. That opinion has to of been generated from numerous sources in the front office in Lambeau. Also, Favre talked to Rodgers recently so to say that he thinks he’ll play for someone else has to raise some Packers fans eyebrows as it could indicate Rodgers’ frustration.

Before the 2018 season, Rodgers signed a four-year, $134 million contract extension. Due to a December renegotiation meant to create much-needed salary-cap space for 2020, Rodgers has cap numbers of $36.35 million (with a base salary of $14.7 million) in 2021, $39.85 million (with a base salary of $25 million) in 2022 and $28.4 million (with a base salary of $25 million) in 2023. That shows that his contract is more loaded in the first two years than the last two. This could in hindsight indicate that the Packers could move off of Rodgers in two years and develop Jordan Love to take over before 2022.

This just sends a disrespectful message to Aaron Rodgers. He has every right to be disappointed and frustrated with the organization. The man went on national airwaves saying he wants to finish his career as a Packer and compete to win another Lombardi for “Title Town” for those loyal cheese-heads. A team that should do everything to surround their Hall of Fame quarterback with talent on a “Win Now” team is instead preparing for the future. The Green Bay front office has totally blow all trust between Rodgers.

In my opinion, Aaron Rodgers should demand for a trade and hold out til so this year. I don’t advocate for those actions but in this scenario if I was Aaron Rodgers I would understand if he does. Why waste years off of your career to try to win while the team has other ideas and brought in someone with a first-round pick to replace you. Force your way out and go to a team that will do anything to make you happy and satisfied. If he stays in Green Bay, it will be a disappointing end to his legacy.

What would be an ideal team that would trade for Rodgers? Maybe the Chargers, Patriots, Bills, Jaguars, Raiders, or even the Bears. You have to think this, however. At least 20 teams in the NFL would stop everything they are doing and try at everything to have Aaron Rodgers on their team. It just seems like, with all the moves and stories, the Green Bay Packers aren’t one of those teams.

Wesley Splain

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